Weight-Bearing Exercise. You don't necessarily need to lift weights to build muscle and strength. Any weight-bearing activity that forces your body to work against gravity can make you stronger. This is especially true if you aren't used to exercising, because your muscles will be more challenged by activities than someone who is stronger and more experienced. Examples of weight-bearing exercises include:

Push Up Test - This test measures muscular endurance. Men should perform this test using 'military style' (knees straight) while women should use the 'bent knee' position. Participants should perform as many pushups as possible while keeping proper form until exhaustion. An adult male performing 25-30 repetitions and an adult female performing 20-25 repetitions are considered 'above average.'
An example of a test with average results would be a woman doing between 20-25 push-ups during a muscular endurance test. In all cases of activity, proper precautions should be taken to avoid injuries or other health complications. Consulting with a physician prior to starting an exercise program is recommended. Other professionals, such as personal trainers or exercise physiologists, should also be considered as resources to help create a program that is the best fit based on personal needs.
Many of the activities you do to build strength will also help your balance. Balance is partly a matter of developing your small stabilizer muscles that provide support and keep you steady. Free weight exercises, such as lunges and deadlifts, will help strengthen the stabilizer muscles. Even better, include some single-leg exercises, such as single-leg deadlifts and pistol squats, in your strength-training routine.
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